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Field Management

Guess who drew this map? If you need a tip, the only people who can stop the whole world from exploding is management.  Management has the scissors, the fuse is on their side and instead of cutting it they are spending time fighting.  All the damage of course will be to the “field.”  Headquarter and

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Director

“I’m the HR director standing on stilts because I have to talk to the director, but I don’t really have any power.  Labor Relations (L.R.) and Personnel (Pers) are about to make me fall down.”  This was a state government organization.  Notice that “Labor” is in a turret with a fence around it with a

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Tornado

I’m the HR director standing on stilts because I have to talk to the director, but I don’t really have any power. Labor Relations (L.R.) and Personnel (Pers) are about to make me fall down.” This was a state government organization. Notice that “Labor” is in a turret with a fence around it with a window but no door. The central turret is open at the top with a person clearly “available.” The stance of this person reminds me of the woman behind the desk when I needed to change a class in college. She was the one person who could make it happen, but she really was sick of students asking to change classes. “Administration” the place you go when you are a problem…have a problem…same difference. THEN..look at IT. Information Technology was considered invasive at this agency and they talked like “aliens” thus the UFO. Try to understand with lots of stupid questions and you get “You don’t need to know that. Just (insert jargon) and you will be fine.” This one picture created insight for the HR person about balance and boundaries. The HR guys who kept agreeing they had to stop using jargon, finally “got it” from seeing themselves portrayed here. Notice also they are portrayed as lazy. IT guys simply have a different definition of urgent than most employees. Fixing your laptop does not equal a system-wide failure.

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Incommunicado

This was drawn by a cross-functional task team in a high tech company where distrust was a big problem.  Projects were way behind deadline, blame had eroded working relationships and a dangerous apathy drained employees of enthusiasm.  The first two meetings with this group were frustrating – either no one was willing to speak or

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Victims of Victims

This picture was drawn by an employee of a large bureaucratic organization.  When she lifted it up, there was a hush of recognition in the group.   She said “This is me in the vice.  But it could be any of us, really.  We are all taking turns.  All of these people are just waiting their

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Storyteller’s Confession: My Secret Mission

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Stories with a Moral Blueprint – part 8 of 8

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Stories with a Moral Blueprint – part 7 of 8

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Stories with a Moral Blueprint – part 6 of 8

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